Announcing DeadTrees

Today I’m releasing DeadTrees, a WordPress plugin to share the books you read. Get it from wordpress.org or search for DeadTrees in the Plugins > Add section of your WordPress admin.

Features

DeadTrees lets you post the books you read, with or without writing about them, (really, does the internet need to know what you thought of the last mystery you read?). It generates Amazon affiliate links to those books so you, (or I), can make a little money if your readers buy the books, and it auto-fetches the books’ cover art from Amazon so things look cool.

Why?

I have been posting about books that I read for a while now, but ground to a halt when I got lazy & didn’t want to write a whole post about each book, and realized often it doesn’t matter what I think about a book. However, I did want to keep posting at least the te title & author of each book I read, (and so my sister can check to see what I’ve read before giving me a book).

Why write a plugin when there are other plugins to share the books I read? Because the other plugins didn’t do it how I wanted them to. I couldn’t find another plugin that uses WordPress’s Custom Post Types to store books I’ve read, and books are such a perfect use of CPTs that they’re even used as the example in the WordPress documentation!

Support & All That

I’ve put DeadTrees up at GitHub, if you have issues try to submit them there. My contact page is also always available to reach me.

See It Live

DeadTrees is up & running here. Take a look at the books I’ve read.

Regular Expression Testing Tool

I had a mod_rewrite problem that was really tough, tough enough that I needed to break down my Regular Expression step by step and see what was matching. I’m not a huge fan of doing this in Terminal, and I work on a Mac so Editpad Pro was out, (it’s good to use on a PC). So, I built a web-based tool to see how my regular expression was matched against a string. It’s available here.

To use it enter a Regular Expression, and a string to match it against. It’ll tell you if the regex matches the string and if so it’ll show you the substring that matches the regex, (if it is a substring), and any parenthetical substring matches.

This little script uses PHP’s native preg_match() function to determine matches, I believe its matching engine is very, very, close to Apache’s engine used in mod_rewrite so it should work well.

So, did this help me solve my problem? Yes it did. It told me that the problem wasn’t in the rewrite rule that I thought it was in.

Try out the Regular Expression Testing Tool.

Update 29 December 2010: I posted a small update to make the input fields larger and corrected some text when the regex does not match.