Vanilla Speed

Me: I wonder how to make this cool new HTML5 feature interact with Javascript properly.

Googles…

Stack Overflow Answer #1: Use this great jQuery function!

Stack Overflow Answer #2: Underscore.js is better, us it! You only need 1/2 a character of code.

Smacks desk in frustration.

I’m working on a major overhaul of an existing website that focuses on speed and a great mobile experience that has never used Javascript libraries, (it was originally written in 2007 before they were a thing), and we’re not changing that. For this website a library is a bunch of extra code to download, execute, and take up memory, which adds extra function calls between the code I write and the things that happen in the browser – more CPU cycles, more battery drain, more waiting, and no benefit to our users and customers.

If we were using jQuery I wouldn’t have spent some time looking up the differences in event creation between browsers, and I might not have spent the morning figuring out why a datalist wasn’t appearing properly in Firefox, or maybe I would have had to do that bit of debugging anyway. One thing that doesn’t help me move the project along at all is other people’s over-reliance on Javascript libraries that is so prevalent. In 2007 when I had a problem I could Google it, or post to a forum, and find an answer, (assuming it had been done before), today I experience the sequence of events at the top of this post several times every day. This is why the trio of blog posts last week, (Marco Arment’s post about PPK’s post about John Gruber’s take on Facebook Instant), have really resonated with me. PPK is right, we need to stop relying on libraries, whether it’s jQuery, underscore, or whatever. There are times when a library is the right tool, but with modern Javascript APIs, HTML5, and CSS3, and good browser support for all but the absolute bleeding-edge.

To use a Javascript library is to externalize the cost of development onto your customers and users.

Despite my frustration with the “use some library” responses on Stack Overflow questions using plain vanilla JavaScript has turned out to be an enjoyable learning experience. I’ve been able to make everything work, (so far), with way less code than was needed in 2007. Of course, if your browser can’t handle the project’s Javascript requirements the JS is not loaded at all and you get the plain HTML experience, which isn’t so bad either.

For more on choosing not to burden your users and customers with unneeded slowness, see the ALA article Choosing Vanilla Javascript, which is 15 months old now, and things have just gotten better since it was published!

Apache/cPanel Log Analysis using MySQL

Every once in a while I need to analyze log files from a web server. Sometimes people ask my what is sucking up all the bandwidth on their hosting plan, other times bots are driving them crazy so we try to identify easy ones to block. Sometimes we want to know how many times a certain URL, or group of URLs was loaded. The logs I work with usually come from LAMP servers running cPanel on a shared host but the techniques below are adaptable to any format by adjusting the import query.

Tools:

I usually use Sequel Pro to run queries. Even when writing the queries myself I prefer a GUI to the command line. It is much easier to inspect tables visually and my query history is saved. That said, we’re working with plain SQL here, (maybe with a bit of MySQL flavour), so any MySQL client will work.

You also need a MySQL server to process the queries. I use the same one as I use for development on my laptop, if you use MAMP, WAMP, or any other AMP you should have access to a local MySQL server.

Part 1: Setup

Before analyzing the data it must be imported, and before importing data there needs to be a table to put it in. Here is the CREATE TABLE statement I use:

 CREATE TABLE `analysis_job` (
`ip` varchar(16) DEFAULT NULL,
`clientid` varchar(128) DEFAULT NULL,
`userid` varchar(128) DEFAULT NULL,
`timestamp` varchar(128) DEFAULT NULL,
`offset` varchar(128) DEFAULT NULL,
`request` varchar(250) DEFAULT NULL,
`status` int(128) DEFAULT '0',
`size` int(128) DEFAULT '0',
`referrer` varchar(250) DEFAULT NULL,
`useragent` varchar(250) DEFAULT NULL,
`ts` datetime DEFAULT NULL,
`uts` bigint(10) DEFAULT NULL
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

A few of these columns may need more explanation:

  • clientid: something Apache creates, almost alway blank
  • userid: something else Apache creates almost always blank
  • request: the contents of the HTTP request, includes the HTTP method, (usually GET or POST), the URL, and the HTTP version
  • status: the HTTP Status code the server sent
  • size: the size of the response. I believe this is in bytes.
  • ts: A timestamp with better formatting than the timestamp column to make it easier to do date operations, (we’ll compute this after importing the data)
  • uts: A Unix Timestamp representation of the ts column, handy for sorting.

Each line of the log file is a single HTTP request. The import statement tells the MySQL server that the fields are enclosed by double quotes and delimited by spaces, from left to right. This means that the timestamp gets broken into two columns, hence the timestamp and offset columns in the CREATE TABLE statement above.

And here’s a sample log entry for a request from Bingbot, (this is a single line from the log file, it is wrapped to multiple lines here):

127.0.0.1 - - [30/Nov/2014:04:00:45 -0800] "GET /directory/page.html HTTP/1.1" 200 9499 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; bingbot/2.0; +http://www.bing.com/bingbot.htm)"

For this request the column values are:

ip:
127.0.0.1
clientid:
userid:
timestamp:
[30/Nov/2014:04:00:45
offset:
-0800]
request:
GET /directory/page.html HTTP/1.1
status:
200
size:
9499
referrer:
useragent:
Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; bingbot/2.0; +http://www.bing.com/bingbot.htm)

The WHM/cPanel based servers that I have encountered always use this log format, but if the server you are working with is different you will have to modify the CREATE TABLE statement to match it.

Part 2: Importing Data

With the table set up it’s fairly quick & easy to import the data:

#Import data
LOAD DATA LOCAL INFILE '/path/to/logfile/logfile' 
INTO TABLE analysis_job
FIELDS TERMINATED BY ' ' ENCLOSED BY '"' LINES TERMINATED BY "\n";

This loads everything into the table. Now we have to extract an actual date from the timestamp column and turn it into a datetime for the ts column using MySQL’s STR_TO_DATE() function:

# to make the string into an actual datetime
UPDATE analysis_job SET ts = STR_TO_DATE(timestamp, '[%d/%b/%Y:%H:%i:%s');

Now there’s a small problem to solve: If the system timezone setting on the server is different from the timezone setting in MySQL on whatever computer you’re using as a database server, and if you want to be able to ask “what happened today in my timezone?” we need to shift the content of the ts column to match your timezone. You can see the UTC offset of the server by looking at the offset column. In my case the original server is on Pacific Time, and I’m on Eastern Time, so we need to add 3 hours to ts:

# adjust timezone
UPDATE analysis_job SET ts = DATE_ADD(ts, INTERVAL 3 HOUR);

If you want to have the Unix Timestamp version of ts available to you then you need to set it:

# Set unix timestamp column
UPDATE analysis_job SET uts = UNIX_TIMESTAMP( ts );

Part 3: Analysis

Here’s the fun part. If you’re good with the ORDER BY and GROUP BY clauses of SQL, and their corresponding functions, you can find all sorts of interesting stuff. Here are some examples that I’ve used:

Find the total bandwidth used during the time your log file spans:

SELECT SUM(size) as totalsize, (SUM(size) / 1048576) as MB FROM analysis_job;

Or for the last week, (change the WHERE clause for different timeframes):

SELECT SUM(size) as totalsize, (SUM(size) / 1048576) as MB FROM analysis_job WHERE ts > DATE_SUB( NOW(), INTERVAL 1 WEEK );

Find the requests, (and therefore files), that use the most bandwidth:

SELECT request, SUM(size) as totalsize, (SUM(size) / 1048576) as MB FROM analysis_job GROUP BY request ORDER BY totalsize Desc;

Do you suspect there’s one computer out there hammering your site? Find the IP that’s using the most bandwidth:

SELECT ip, SUM(size) as totalsize, (SUM(size) / 1048576) as MB FROM analysis_job GROUP BY ip ORDER BY totalsize Desc;

Or the User-Agent:

SELECT useragent, SUM(size) as totalsize, (SUM(size) / 1048576) as MB FROM analysis_job GROUP BY useragent ORDER BY totalsize Desc;

Who is hammering you with the most requests?

SELECT ip, COUNT(*) as requests FROM analysis_job GROUP BY ip ORDER BY requests Desc;

Again, group by User-Agent to find the program, (assuming the User-Agent isn’t spoofed):

SELECT user agent, COUNT(*) as requests FROM analysis_job GROUP BY user agent ORDER BY requests Desc;

Any of these can be restricted by date, like we did with bandwidth above.

You can also zoom in on one User-Agent, for example:

SELECT * FROM analysis_job WHERE useragent='Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 7.0b; Windows NT 6.0)';

Or certain file types:

SELECT * FROM analysis_job WHERE request LIKE '%.css%'; # CSS
SELECT * FROM analysis_job WHERE request LIKE '%.html%'; # HTML

Mix it up for detailed analysis. This finds the IPs that have sent the most hits in the past 5 hours that don’t declare themselves as bots and are accessing normal parts of the website, (not cPanel, stats packages, robots.txt, etc):

# Non-bot IPs that have sent the most hits in the last 5 hours
SELECT COUNT(*) AS cnt, ip FROM analysis_job 
WHERE
ts > DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 5 HOUR) 
AND useragent NOT LIKE '%bot%' 
AND useragent NOT LIKE '%spider%' 
AND useragent NOT LIKE 'Mediapartners%' 
AND request NOT LIKE '%/api/1/%' 
AND request NOT LIKE '%/media/%'
AND request NOT LIKE '%/pub/%'
AND request NOT LIKE '%cpanel/%'
AND request NOT LIKE '%mint/%'
AND request NOT LIKE '%/robots.txt%'
GROUP BY ip
ORDER BY cnt Desc;

Part 4: Other Considerations

While this data can help find interesting traffic patterns and trends it is important to remember that IP addresses can be spoofed or proxied and User-Agents can be set to whatever a client wants so those values cannot be entirely trusted.

In addition, if you use CloudFlare, the IP address will almost always be the IP of a CloudFlare server unless your host has mod_cloudflare, or some equivalent, installed.

Even with these caveats server logs are an untapped information mine, and having a chunk of time in a database table makes it much easier to dig in that mine.

Adding to a WordPress page’s URL without changing the URL of its Child Pages.

I was recently asked to add an extra path component to the URL of a WordPress page for SEO reasons. It took some diving into the internals of WordPress. Here’s the setup:

  • WordPress is installed in the site root, at example.com
  • We are using a static homepage
  • The company blog is at example.com/blog/
  • I was asked to make the blog URL be example.com/blog/some-extra-keywords/ without changing the URL of the current and future blog posts, which are currently example.com/blog/post-name/

There are 3 things required to make this work:

  1. A filter to tell WordPress to process requests for /blog/some-extra-keywords/ as if they are for /blog/
  2. A filter to change permalinks from /blog/ to /blog/some-extra-keywords/ (Optional, but recommended).
  3. A redirect from /blog/ to /blog/some-extra-keywords/ (Also optional, but also recommended).

Treat /blog/some-extra-keywords/ requests like /blog/

We don’t want to change the URL of the blog page in WordPress’s Edit Page screen because that will change the URL of past and future all blog posts. We need to tell WordPress that a request for /blog/some-extra-keywords/ is a request for /blog/. This is done by adding a filter to WordPress’s request filter hook:

/**
 * Make the URL /blog/some-extra-keywords/ respond as /blog/ 
 * would.
 * @param  array $request The request array that WP generates.
 * @return array          The modified request array.
 */
function jb_filter_blog_url_request( $request ) {

    if ( isset( $request['name'] ) && 'some-extra-keywords' == $request['name'] ) {
                // it's a page we're requesting. If you're doing this to something other
                // than a page, try setting $request['name'], and don't unset it 2 lines
                // later
        $request['pagename'] = 'blog';
        unset( $request['name'] );
    }

    return $request;
}
add_filter( 'request', 'jb_filter_blog_url_request' );

Since WordPress identifies pieces of content by the last part of the URL, (the “name”), that’s all we have to change. In this case, because the blog is on a page, we had to set $request['pagename'].

Note: This is optional, but recommended. If you don’t do this you must do the next item, (redirect /blog/ to /blog/some-extra-keywords/), but you get the most SEO benefit if you do both.

With #1 it’s time to change links to the blog page to point to the new URL. The old URL still works, and you’ll be redirecting it in Step 3, but modifying the links cuts out a round-trip to the server, making your site faster, and it means that anytime a spider crawls the site it will find the correct URL.

Again, we create a filter function and hook it up. Because I’m doing this all to a page, I’m hooking on to the page_link filter, but the function also works with the post_link filter. In fact, I originally used the post_link filter, which doesn’t work for pages, and spent a while banging my head against a wall trying to figure out why it didn’t work.

By hooking into page_link or post_link you’ll modify the URL everywhere it is generated with get_permalink(), which is almost everywhere. Menus, lists of pages, and even the XML Sitemap that Yoast’s WordPress SEO plugin makes will be have the new URL. If you have typed the URL somewhere this filter will not change it, but that’s why you’ll set up a redirect in Step 3.

The code:

/**
 * Modifies the blog URL when it's requested using get_permalink(). 
 * 
 * Note that this filter is set up to work on both posts & pages, and the 
 * post_link and page_link filters don't pass quite the same parameters:
 * - $post is an post object for post_link and a post ID for page_link, so we
 *   get the post object if $post is numeric
 * - $dontuse is completely different between the two filters, but not needed,
 *   so we ignore it.
 * 
 * @param  string $url       The URL to be filtered.
 * @param  mixed  $post      The post ID or post object that corresponds to $url
 * @param  mixed  $leavename Differs depending on filter. Ignore.
 * @return string            The possibly-modified URL.
 */
function jb_modify_blog_url( $url, $post, $leavename ) {
    $true = false;
 
        // don't do it in the admin, I'm afraid the modified URL will get
        // added to the URL slug field on the Edit Page screen, and get
        // permanently added, with another copy of it being added every time
        // the page is saved.
    if( ! is_admin() ) {

        if ( is_numeric( $post ) ) {
            $post = get_post( $post );
        }


        if( 'blog' == $post->post_name ) {
            $url .= 'some-extra-keywords/';
        }
    }
    return $url;
}
add_filter( 'page_link', 'jb_modify_blog_url', 10, 3 );

The magic is in the third if condition: If the page name is ‘blog’ add the extra keywords to the URL.

Redirect from /blog/ to /blog/some-extra-keywords/

Note: This is optional, as well, but if you don’t do it the blog homepage will be available at both /blog and /blog/some-extra-keywords/ which could lead to a duplicate content penalty from Google.

We’re going to do a 301 Redirect to tell search engines that the blog is now at /blog/some-extra-keywords/. I’m going to do this in a .htaccess file because that way the web server doesn’t have to start PHP or WordPress.

If you’ve already got a rewrite section in your .htaccess file, add the following line to it:

RewriteRule ^blog/?$ /blog/some-extra-keywords/ [R=301,L]

This will redirect both /blog/ and /blog, (the first ? makes the slash right before it optional), to /blog/some-extra-keywords/. If you don’t have a rewrite section, add one:

<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
RewriteEngine On
RewriteBase /

RewriteRule ^blog/?$ /blog/whole-house-fan-energy-saving-tips/ [R=301,L]

</IfModule>

And that’s it.

Improving Versioning of WordPress Static Files

I was recently asked to improve the PageSpeed and YSlow scores of a WordPress-based website that I work on. One of the items that PageSpeed checks is “Don’t include a query string in the URL for static resources,” (under the “Leverage Proxy Caching” heading). I suspect this is most important when you are using a CDN, or otherwise run through a proxy server. WordPress puts a version in the query string of any JavaScript or CSS that’s enqueued using wp_enqueue_script() or wp_enqueue_style().

Interestingly, PageSpeed doesn’t seem to complain about the WordPress-included static resources that have a query string on the URL, only about static resources on 3rd-party URLs. I’m not sure why this is, but let’s remove the query strings from the WordPress-included static resources anyway, while still maintaining a version somewhere in the URL so we can set far-future Expires headers.

The format of a WordPress version tag is ver={version number}, like this: example.com/wp-content/themes/theme-name/style.css?ver=2.0.5.4, but example.com/ver2.0.5.4/wp-content/themes/theme-name/style.css should be more cacheable. There are two steps to making this happen:

1) Use Apache’s mod_rewrite to Serve the Correct File to the Updated URL

In step 2 we’ll be moving the version tag to the beginning of the URL, we only need one RewriteRule to make it work:

# This goes in your .htaccess file, before the WordPress section
<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
RewriteEngine On
RewriteBase /

## Cache-Busting ##
RewriteRule ^ver([\d\.\-a-zA-Z]+)/(.*) $2?ver=$1 [L] #match something with the version tag right at the beginning of the URL
## Done cache-busting ##

</IfModule>

The rule above matches any URL that starts with “ver” followed by any number of letters, numbers, periods, dashes, and underscores, captures that collection of characters up to the first forward slash, then it captures everything after the first forward slash. The URL is rewritten as $2?ver=$1 where $2 is everything after the version tag, (the original URL, with no version tag), and $1 is the version number that’s added, internally, to the query string, but never appears in the browser.

Note: It is probably possible to leave off the ?ver=$1, but I haven’t tried it yet.

Now example.com/wp-content/themes/theme-name/style.css?ver=2.0.5.4 and example.com/ver2.0.5.4/wp-content/themes/theme-name/style.css should both serve up the same style.css file.

2) Filter the URLs for Enqueued Scripts & Styles to Move the Version Tag from the Querystring into the Path

The URL for every enqueued Javascript is filtered by the script_loader_src filter, and the URL for every enqueued stylesheet is filtered by the style_loader_src filter, so we’ll use these filters to put the new, improved URL in the HTML. This is an absolute URL, so we can take it apart, move the parts around so that it looks how we like. Here’s the function I’m using to change the URLs, plus two lines to hook on to the filters:

/**
 * Changes WordPress's default versioned URLs from putting the verion in the
 * querystring to putting the version as part of the file page, (requires 
 * .htaccess modification to work). If there's no version in the querystring
 * one can be added by setting the $defaultversion.
 * @param  string  $url            The URL to change the location of the version.
 * @param  mixed   $defaultversion A string default verion. Defaults to false, (
 *                                 no default version).
 * @return string                  The new URL.
 */
function jb_better_versioned_url( $url, $defaultversion = false ) {

    // don't bother for the admin
    if ( ! is_admin() ) {

        // parse the URL
        $parts = parse_url( $url );

        // and the querystring
        $query = wp_parse_args( $parts['query'], array() );

        // check if there's a version in the querystring. If so, do more.
        if ( isset( $query['ver'] ) || false !== $defaultversion ) {

            if ( isset( $query['ver'] ) ) {
                // prepend "/ver" + {version value} to the *path*
                $parts['path'] = '/ver' . $query['ver'] . $parts['path'];

                // unset the version in the querystring, since it's in the path now.
                unset( $query['ver'] );
            } else {
                $parts['path'] = '/ver' . $defaultversion . $parts['path'];
            }

            // if this is a PHP file just let it be.
            if( ! preg_match( '~\.php$~', $parts['path'] ) ) {
            

                // start rebuilding the URL string
                $url = $parts['scheme'] . '://' . $parts['host'] . $parts['path'];

                // see if there's still anything in the query
                if ( count( $query ) > 0 ) {

                    // rebuild query with whatever remains
                    $parts['query'] = build_query( $query );

                    // append it to the URL string
                    $url .= '?' . $parts['query'];
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return $url;

}

// hook onto the filters
add_filter( 'style_loader_src', 'jb_better_versioned_url' );
add_filter( 'script_loader_src', 'jb_better_versioned_url' );

With these two modifications all of your JavaScript & CSS will have the version in the path instead of the querystring. In addition, any images, fonts, or anything else referenced with relative URLs from your stylesheets will have the version in the beginning of their URL, which will be rewritten and the file served properly. This way if you ever have caching problems you can bump a version number and browsers will pull new versions of all your static resources.

A Word of Warning

This involves considerable coding acrobatics, and adds complexity to your WordPress-based site, for speed improvements that may not be very large, and may not exist at all, so use this method at your own risk.

I have this code in production, but would love to hear the opinions of others on it, that’s what the comments are for, or Twitter, or elsewhere – just let me know where the technique is discussed.

Conditionally Loading Javascript & CSS with Fancybox for WordPress

The Problem

I’ve been working on improving the performance of a client’s WordPress-based website recently and it’s become very clear to me just how much CSS & Javascript plugins load, even when it’s not needed.

On this particular website 47% of the Javascript and 57% of the CSS loaded on the site’s homepage is not required on the homepage, but is required elsewhere, so it should be loaded conditionally. Sometimes this is easy, but sometimes it’s not.

Fancybox for WordPress is not an easy plugin to make load client-side resources, after all, it’s made to show a lightbox on any image, and especially on any gallery. When the wp_enqueue_scripts action happens, where it is recommended that we set the scripts and styles that will be used on a page, we don’t yet know what will be on the page. Fortunately, we can call the wp_enqueue_script() function after that, during the body of the page, and those scripts will be printed in the wp_footer() function. The same is true for wp_enqueue_style(). So, here’s what we do:

  1. Stop Fancybox for WordPress from including its scripts & styles by default.
  2. If a gallery or image that we want to use Fancybox on is displayed, we tell WordPress to display the Fancybox scripts & styles in the footer.
  3. Enjoy faster pageloads.

Sounds simple, but there are a few interesting bits. Now for the code.

The Code

I use three functions to check if the Fancybox scripts & styles are needed. They can be in a theme’s functions.php, (where I have them at the moment), or they could even be rolled into their own plugin.

First tell Fancybox not to include its code by default. Instead of manually dequeuing every style & script, remove the Fancybox functions that do the enqueuing from the wp_enqueue_scripts and wp_head action hooks:

// don't enqueue Fancybox scripts by default.
function jb_dequeue_fancybox_css_js() {
    remove_action( 'wp_enqueue_scripts', 'mfbfw_styles' );
    remove_action( 'wp_enqueue_scripts', 'mfbfw_scripts' );
    remove_action( 'wp_head', 'mfbfw_init' );
}
add_action( 'wp', 'jb_dequeue_fancybox_css_js' );

Next create a function that re-enables Fancybox, and remembers that it did so. Here there are two static variables, which will hold their value between function calls, (kind of like hidden globals), which store state. The $fancybox_is_used variable is returned so this function can be called with no arguments to find out if Fancybox has been used on page. Note the priority of 25 when hooking mfbfw_init() to the wp_footer action. This is needed because mfbfw_init() prints some Javascript to the page that relies on jQuery, and WordPress prints the enqueued scripts in the wp_footer action with a priority of 20, so mfbfw_init() needs to execute with a priority higher than 20.

function jb_fancybox_is_used( $used = false ) {

    // this is returned so we can call this function with no arguments to learn
    // if Fancybox has been used on a particular page.
    static $fancybox_is_used = false;

    // remember if Fancybox has been re-enabled already, so we don't enqueue the 
    // scripts multiple times
    static $fancybox_is_setup = false;

    if( $used === true ) {
        $fancybox_is_used = true;
    }

    if( $fancybox_is_used && ! $fancybox_is_setup ) {
        if( function_exists( 'mfbfw_styles' ) ) {
            mfbfw_styles();  // enqueue fancybox styles
            mfbfw_scripts(); // enqueue fancybox scripts
            // the 25 is important. WordPress prints footer scripts in the
            // wp_footer action with a priority of 20, and mfbfw_init() has to
            // be called after the footer scripts are already on the page.
            add_action( 'wp_footer', 'mfbfw_init', 25 ); 
        }
        $fancybox_is_setup = true;
    }

    return $fancybox_is_used;
}

Finally, make a function that looks for places where Fancybox is used on the page. On the site I’m working on the CSS class fancybox is used on images and in galleries that I want to be Fancyboxed, so I look for the string “fancybox” in the_content filter, and when it’s found I call jb_fancybox_is_used( true ) to re-enable Fancybox on the page. I added this to the_content with priority 11 because shortcodes, including gallery shortcodes, are executed at priority 10, and I want to be able to look through the output of short codes for the fancybox CSS class:

function jb_hunt_for_fancybox( $content ) {

    if( false !== stripos( $content, 'fancybox') || false !== stripos( $content, 'thickbox' ) ) {
        jb_fancybox_is_used( true );
    }
    return $content;
}
add_filter( 'the_content', 'jb_hunt_for_fancybox', 11 );

If you include a something you want to fancybox in a template you can call jb_fancybox_is_used( true ) manually from the template file to include the CSS & Javascript.

Other Ways

This isn’t the only way to conditionally include Fancybox’s Javascript & CSS. Instead of using jb_hunt_for_fancybox() to filter the_content there’s probably an action or filter in the gallery shortcode that jb_fancybox_is_used() could be hooked onto. It may even be possible to use the $wp_query object in an action hook just before wp_enqueue_scripts to determine if there is content on the page that needs to be Fancyboxed, let that decide whether or not to run jb_dequeue_fancybox_css_js(), and forget about the other two functions.

Let’s Do Better

Plugin authors should be working hard to only add what is needed to each page load. Who is doing a great job? How can we hack our themes to bend other plugins to our will? Comment or tweet @johnbeales to let me know.