Changing the Auto-Suggest Behaviour in WooCommerce

A request came in this week from a client with a WooCommerce store:

I just placed an order through our website and had an issue with the state. The customer lives in Oregon, so I typed “O” hoping Oregon would auto populate, but it didn’t. I was stuck having to scroll through all 50 states to find Oregon.

An animated Gif showing WooCommerce's default autosuggest behaviour on select boxes.
Confusing for most people.

I tried it, and it’s true. Typing “o” doesn’t narrow the list down much, and the way it does narrow it down doesn’t make much sense in this context: The autosuggest on the State field matches the search phrase anywhere in one of the options, so typing “o” gets you a list of all states with the letter “o” in the state name, ordered alphabetically by state name. Go ahead and try it out in a WooCommerce demo shop.

Out of the box WooCommerce uses SelectWoo, which is essentially Select2 with more accessibility. Select2’s default behaviour of matching the typed text to any part of an option makes sense in many places, especially when searching a store or for categories, but for selecting states, (and countries, although slightly less), it’s confusing.

Nothing’s filterable, but we can set a default

Select2 lets us set the callback function used for matching, so we can customize the matching behaviour, but there’s a problem, the settings for SelectWoo are set in WooCommerce’s country-select.js file, and there’s no way to filter them, so we can’t change the matching behaviour on initialization. It turns out that once a Select2/SelectWoo instance is initialized there’s no way to change the settings either.

When I got to here I thought we were out of luck – either I’d be creating a child theme and re-implementing the checkout, or we were going to live with SelectWoo’s default filtering behaviour. Luckily, I found one way to change the matching callback: It’s possible to set the default SelectWoo options callback before any instances are initialized. So that’s what we’re going to do.

Server-Side

First we need to add a bit of Javascript to our checkout page, so we enqueue a small script that’s dependent on the selectWoo script.


namespace JB\WooAutosuggest;



function enqueue_frontend_scripts() {
    
    if( function_exists('is_checkout') && is_checkout() ) {

        wp_enqueue_script( 'jb-was-checkout-autosuggest', plugins_url( '../assets/checkout-autosuggest.js', __FILE__), array('selectWoo') );

    }
}

add_action( 'wp_enqueue_scripts', __NAMESPACE__ . '\enqueue_frontend_scripts', 20 );

And that’s all the PHP we need! Because our solution changes the default matching behaviour we are careful to only enqueue this script on the Checkout page using WooCommerce’s is_checkout() function.

Client-Side

The enqueued Javascript file is pretty simple as well:

(function($) {
    // Based on custom matcher here: https://select2.org/searching#customizing-how-results-are-matched
    function start_matcher(params, data ) {
        
        // If there are no search terms, return all of the data
        if ($.trim(params.term) === '') {
          return data;
        }

        // Do not display the item if there is no 'text' property
        if (typeof data.text === 'undefined') {
          return null;
        }

        // `params.term` should be the term that is used for searching
        // `data.text` is the text that is displayed for the data object
        // Make sure to compare in the same case! 
        if ( data.text.toLowerCase().indexOf(params.term.toLowerCase() ) === 0 ) {
            return data;
        }
        // Return `null` if the term should not be displayed
        return null;
    }
    $.fn.select2.defaults.set('matcher', start_matcher );
})(jQuery);

There’s a closure so we don’t pollute the global namespace, then we define a new matcher function that matches the beginning of the phrase, and set it as the default matcher. This code runs as soon as it’s ready – it doesn’t wait for a DOMReady event, because by the time DOMReady fires the SelectWoo boxes have probably been initialized already.

Conclusion

I wish we didn’t have to set the defaults for the whole page, but that’s what we’re stuck with at the moment. We could apply different matching patterns to different pages by adding a few more conditions to the PHP block, and a bit more Javascript. This works to make the checkout page work as expected, though.

All the code is up on Github as a WordPress plugin. If it’s useful let me know!

An animated Gif showing WooCommerce's autosuggest matching the beginning of each option.
This makes more sense!

What do you think?

Your name and E-mail address, and of course a comment, are required. I won't do anything evil with your E-mail address.

If you so desire, you may use these tags in your comment: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.